A Blog About Intellectual Property Litigation and the District of Delaware


Entries for tag: expert-discovery

Pennies.
Pennies. Mark Bosky, Unsplash

I always find it interesting to see what kinds of facts that can succeed in a motion to strike. As I've mentioned, motions to strike in the Third Circuit are governed by the Pennypack factors, which can be tricky to meet and often favor lesser remedies (although the Court does strike things).

Here is what it took to warrant striking portions of an opening infringement report Arendi S.A.R.L. v. LG Electronics, C.A. No. 12-1595-LPS (D. Del.):

  • Disclosing infringement contentions against five new products for the first time;
  • Relying on previously undisclosed evidence;
  • Doing so in the 8th year of a case (albeit one currently without a trial date); …

Although it requires some reading between the redacted lines, Judge Stark's recent ruling in H. Lundbeck A/S v. Apotex, Inc., C.A. No. 18-88-LPS is worth the effort. It shows that while sometimes exclusion orders leave the door open a crack to introduce the excluded evidence in some other fashion, that is not always the case.

Unusually Spry Expert Rushes to Supplement Report
Unusually Spry Expert Rushes to Supplement Report Man Holding Handbag, Andy Beales, Unsplash

Judge Andrews recently granted a motion in limine precluding a party from presenting expert opinions that were not disclosed until the expert's deposition -- without analyzing the Pennypack factors.

The correct procedure for challenging a late disclosure of theories or evidence has long been a matter of some debate in Delaware. There are cases suggesting that the party seeking to update its contentions should move for leave to do.

More commonly, a party will simply serve updated contentions or expert reports that the opposing party moves to strike. Regardless, the motions are generally analyzed under the demanding Pennypack factors, with the usual result that the …

Remember these?
Remember these? Tim Gouw, Unsplash

It's often tough to get late-produced theories or evidence excluded in Delaware, because the Court must apply the permissive Pennypack factors that typically favor admission.

The factors include prejudice, ability to cure any prejudice, disruption of trial, and bad faith/willfulness.

But lately, the Court seems to be granting more motions to strike such theories. Today, Judge Andrews granted a motion to strike a late DOE theory.

Judge Andrews Isn't Messing Around

He shot down the Pennypack factors in four short and to-the point paragraphs.

As to the first factor, he found prejudice because admission of a late theory requires the Defendant to present new defenses, and because DOE is a …

When it comes time for expert depositions in multi-defendant cases, parties often disagree about how many deposition hours each side (or more specifically, each party) should get.

Judge Stark addressed this last week in H. Lundbeck A/S v. Apotex Inc., C.A. No. 18-088-LPS (D. Del.), where he permitted seven hours of expert deposition time for common issues and four additional hours for each of the nine defendants for defendant-specific issues.

Plaintiffs' depositions of certain of defendants' experts were expanded as well, to between 9 and 14 hours.

Judge Stark explained that the limits

reflect a reasonable and appropriate exercise of the Court's discretion, considering all circumstances, including the fact that this consolidated case is, in reality, …